Digital Marketing and Social Media Strategy

Occupying our minds

Photo from Flickr by: theunabongerI was listening to the latest Media Hacks podcast this morning on my drive to work. It’s too bad Hugh, CC, Julien, Chris and Mitch can’t connect more often to record this infrequent, but always thought-provoking show.

This episode explored the Occupy movement. There was an interesting conversation about the movement’s lack of leadership or specific demands. I have heard this mentioned many times recently. The informal chat also explored the importance of the culture of startups, entrepreneurship and education reform.

The conversation sparked an idea on how I can brighten my children’s future. What’s interesting is that the idea sprang to my mind as a direct result from the discussion about Occupy’s seemingly lack of direction. Read that again. The idea sprang to my mind as a direct result from the discussion about Occupy.

The majority of the hosts agreed that with no demands, one has to actually stop to question why the Occupy movement exists. Only then do they begin to understand the many injustices that are occurring at the hands of the 1% (actually less than that) that run the global economic system. The movement is making us think and speak openly about it.

Exploring Language Studies

My idea that came from the conversation is about language studies for my children. As a Canadian, it’s important to me that my kids learn French. I also believe that Americans should be taught Spanish as a second language in school. Let’s face it, Spanish is this country’s second language.

For my kids to truly have a brighter future though, they need to learn to code. I really believe this. I think we often forget that programming involves different languages too. The fact that the languages are universal, means that anyone, anywhere can use code to communicate (code even created this).

You’ll need to listen to the full episode to fully understand where I’m coming from with this idea. But the point is that the Occupy movement created a conversation, one that was thankfully recorded and shared. The discussion gave me the idea that I must teach my kids to code.

I’m going to hop on CodeAcademy with the wee ones tonight to see how they do. At the least, it will teach them keyboard and typing skills. But with repetition they should come away with a basic understanding of JavaScript. Not a bad language to know for the future, eh?

One day, many years from now, when my kids are bettering the world with code, they will have the Occupy movement to thank for it. Oh, and of course thanks to the Media Hacks gang for bringing the topic up too.

Photo from Flickr by: theunabonger


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  • I agree with you and while I don’t have kids I’m taking it upon myself to learn how to code.. I took a workshop with Girl Develop It Ottawa that taught Scratch Programming.. It’s a program designed to teach kids the basics of programming so it might be helpful:

  • Awesome Kelly! Thanks for sharing this. I’m definitely looking at other, fun, ways to teach my kids to code.

  • Dave! Hi, I met you at Blogchat.  This is neat! Thanks for sharing the podcast.  I hopped on codeacademy as soon as I read your post, and it is addicting. I just started learning a little bit a few weeks ago, and definitely think it’s nice to know basics. Who would’ve thought: I graduated with a degree in English. =) Out of curiosity – to be more specific, how to you think your kids or other youngsters (I’m still pretty young!) can use code to help the world? 

  • Thanks Anne. It was great to meet you during Blog Chat (more details here folks: )
    It is pretty amazing to consider the importance of programming as an essential language in the future (even now).

    I was thrilled to watch my kids laugh as they typed in their names and then saw them appear after hitting Return. They moved on to entering lines of garbage and then using *.length* to see the total number of characters they had typed – HILARIOUS! Of course they are 5 and 6, but they are also probably pretty easily amused like their old man.

    Thanks for the comment. I hope to see you commenting here again soon. Cheers!