Digital Marketing and Social Media Strategy

I have your house keys

Photo from Flickr by: Derek K. MillerWould you hand over your house keys to a stranger if they promised to leave you something fun or useful? No, right?

The following is one thing you need to know to stop Twitter spam and phishing schemes.

Every time you authorize a third party service to access your Twitter account (or Facebook, or Gmail, etc.), you’re risking trouble. This isn’t to say you shouldn’t necessarily, but you should be careful when doing so.

If you’re just doing something for fun, like TimeTweeting, a neat way to see how much time you’ve wasted using Twitter, just ask for your keys back when you’re done.

Ask for my keys back?

Now look at all of the applications listed. These are the people who you have handed your keys to. Do you still need them? Are you still using their service?

  • Choose Revoke Access

This essentially gets your keys returned. No hard feelings.

I should note that I am not picking on TimeTweeting, in fact I think they’ve done a great job pulling data from multiple sources to create a humorous look at your wasted time.

Have fun with it, but don’t forget to grab your keys when you’re done, it’s easier than changing all of your locks.

Photo from Flickr by: Derek K. Miller (miss ya)


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  • Anonymous

    excellent point, dave, thank you! i just revoked a BUNCH of applications and it felt good. ~amy 

  • Extremely true, and even more true for a service like Facebook that potentially has your address, phone number and other sensitive data listed!

  • Thanks Amy. It’s often surprising to see how many applications have access.

  • Good point. Thanks Rob.