Digital Marketing and Social Media Strategy

Your input is appreciated. To post my tweets on my blog or not?

I’ve been using Twitter Tools for a while now. It’s a great plug-in that will automatically post a tweet to your Twitter account alerting your friends when you have a new blog post. It’s easy to set up and I find it’s very valuable to generate eyeballs to my blog. We all like eyeballs on our blog pages right?

Twitter Tools allows you to enable an automated daily digest of all of your tweets into a single blog post. This has benefits and disadvantages. I’m trying to determine whether it’s worth using or not.

A week or so ago Sean Maney at Grin & Grumble posted about not understanding why I would post my tweets. I commented on his post, but I think it’s worth a discussion here. What are your thoughts? Do you post your tweets?

I like using the daily digest, because it allows me to quickly read and search previous tweets for what I was discussing on any given day, it also helps me relocate links I may have included to interesting stories. This also benefits you guys, because you can do the same. In addition to this, you can read my my conference tweets from Gnomedex, Podcasting New Media Expo and BarCamp Nashville. On another positive note, publishing my tweets is lovely for Google juice.

On the flip side, I’m finding my blog a little cluttered with more content from my twitter than original posts (yes, I need to get blogging more). I also fear it may annoy you guys, because if you’re subscribed to my feed, or visit here regularly you may be expecting less from my twitter account and more from my head. That’s makes sense.

So how about it then? Please let me know what you think. Leave a comment or simply vote (or do both).

[poll=3]

[tags]Twitter Tools[/tags]

Dave

http://www.davemadethat.com

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  • I don’t mind. I think once I even replied to a tweet from you I missed on one of these posts.

  • I don’t see how it could hurt as long as your blog is more than tweets — and clearly it is.

    Keep it up.

  • I don’t mind. I think once I even replied to a tweet from you I missed on one of these posts.

  • I don’t see how it could hurt as long as your blog is more than tweets — and clearly it is.

    Keep it up.

  • Thanks for you input Nico. Good to know. I’m quite curious what the majority of people think about regarding this.

    I see you’re heading to PodCamp Boston. I wish I was going to be there. Next time.

    Cheers,
    Dave

  • Thanks for you input Nico. Good to know. I’m quite curious what the majority of people think about regarding this.

    I see you’re heading to PodCamp Boston. I wish I was going to be there. Next time.

    Cheers,
    Dave

  • Dave,

    I’m abstaining from voting until I better understand. I’ll figure it out!

    Sean

  • Dave,

    I’m abstaining from voting until I better understand. I’ll figure it out!

    Sean

  • Ha! Sean. Fair enough.
    Cheers.

  • Ha! Sean. Fair enough.
    Cheers.

  • I vote no. I follow you on Twitter and I subscribe to your RSS feed, and I think each has its own place. I try to limit replication as much as I can in my life, and I think it makes more sense to leave tweets in their medium and posts in theirs.

  • I vote no. I follow you on Twitter and I subscribe to your RSS feed, and I think each has its own place. I try to limit replication as much as I can in my life, and I think it makes more sense to leave tweets in their medium and posts in theirs.

  • Sorry, I’m a hater, I can follow people on twitter, and when I’m there I want to know what you are up to RIGHT NOW. What was twittered last week is of no interest at all to me.

  • Sorry, I’m a hater, I can follow people on twitter, and when I’m there I want to know what you are up to RIGHT NOW. What was twittered last week is of no interest at all to me.

  • to be honest – I’m not a fan. In the RSS feed when I see someone’s tweet-summary, I skip it right away. Often, it’s because it’s only half a conversation, and who has the time to track the other half down… it’s funny, what makes a great 140character tweet often makes a lousy middle sentence in a stack of (often unrelated) tweets.

    My interaction with twitter has been more off than on recently, and to see it clutter my rss reader is a pain.

    That being said, I do still see a value to it, for links, for situations like Nico showed above – but I do find it makes for an uninteresting blog read. And the desire for google juice is understandable..

    If there was a way to see the RSS without the tweets, that’d be cool.. Maybe categories or something?

  • to be honest – I’m not a fan. In the RSS feed when I see someone’s tweet-summary, I skip it right away. Often, it’s because it’s only half a conversation, and who has the time to track the other half down… it’s funny, what makes a great 140character tweet often makes a lousy middle sentence in a stack of (often unrelated) tweets.

    My interaction with twitter has been more off than on recently, and to see it clutter my rss reader is a pain.

    That being said, I do still see a value to it, for links, for situations like Nico showed above – but I do find it makes for an uninteresting blog read. And the desire for google juice is understandable..

    If there was a way to see the RSS without the tweets, that’d be cool.. Maybe categories or something?

  • One reason I’m not a fan of the Tweets in the blog is because the links are all URLTea links. So, without clicking them, I have no context in which to anticipate what that link might be. In addition, those URLTea links destroy any Google connection between your blog and the things to which you are linking.

    So, really, my issue might be with URLTea, which I can deal with in the context of Twitter, but not in a blog post.

  • One reason I’m not a fan of the Tweets in the blog is because the links are all URLTea links. So, without clicking them, I have no context in which to anticipate what that link might be. In addition, those URLTea links destroy any Google connection between your blog and the things to which you are linking.

    So, really, my issue might be with URLTea, which I can deal with in the context of Twitter, but not in a blog post.

  • @Marina & John: Thanks guys. I really appreciate your input. I’m kind of leaning towards shutting them off too.

    @Alex: I wonder if TinyURL is a better option then? Not sure off hand. It’s a really valid point I didn’t consider. Thanks.

    @Bob: Hmm, you might have something there. I wonder if there is a way to publish the daily digests directly to a page in WordPress, rather than a post. That way they are still available, but don’t show up in the feed. Hmm…

    Thanks guys! You all rock for commenting.

  • @Marina & John: Thanks guys. I really appreciate your input. I’m kind of leaning towards shutting them off too.

    @Alex: I wonder if TinyURL is a better option then? Not sure off hand. It’s a really valid point I didn’t consider. Thanks.

    @Bob: Hmm, you might have something there. I wonder if there is a way to publish the daily digests directly to a page in WordPress, rather than a post. That way they are still available, but don’t show up in the feed. Hmm…

    Thanks guys! You all rock for commenting.

  • Pingback: To post my tweets on my blog or not? PART II()

  • Not to belabor the point. It’s not a problem between URLtea or TinyURL. It’s a problem with any URL shortening service. It removes any context that a reader might glean from the URL itself.

  • Not to belabor the point. It’s not a problem between URLtea or TinyURL. It’s a problem with any URL shortening service. It removes any context that a reader might glean from the URL itself.