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Why we need corn and why corn ethanol is not a great choice for fuel.

My friend, Alex Ezell just told me about a movie called King Corn. It’s a fascinating looking documentary about the many uses of corn.  I’m dying to see this.

King Corn is a feature documentary about two friends, one acre of corn, and the subsidized crop that drives our fast-food nation. In King Corn, Ian Cheney and Curt Ellis, best friends from college on the east coast, move to the heartland to learn where their food comes from. With the help of friendly neighbors, genetically modified seeds, and powerful herbicides, they plant and grow a bumper crop of America’s most-productive, most-subsidized grain on one acre of Iowa soil. But when they try to follow their pile of corn into the food system, what they find raises troubling questions about how we eat-and how we farm.

I recently heard a story on The Current on CBC called Corn Living. I really recommend you take a few minutes to hear this. After listening to the program you will think twice about the use of corn ethanol as an alternative energy.

Also of interest: Who Killed the Electric Car?

[tags]Who Killed the Electric Car, King Corn, Alex Ezell, CBC, The Current, corn ethanol[/tags]

Dave

http://www.davemadethat.com

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  • Interesting post. In Massachusetts, we’ve been forced to use ethanol gasoline for quite some time. I’m all for a cleaner environment, but ethanol has caused numerous problems for boaters. Ethanol loosens deposits in boat fuel tanks and can dissolve resin in these tanks. This causes engines to stop working. What happens next? The fuel has to be disposed of or cleaned. Think of the environmental impact that either of these procedures has when hundreds of gallons of fuel are affected. As a boater, I clearly have strong feelings about ethanol. However, boating aside, I do wonder if the energy used in creating ethanol and transporting it to gas stations outweighs any environmental benefit that may be had from its use.

  • Interesting post. In Massachusetts, we’ve been forced to use ethanol gasoline for quite some time. I’m all for a cleaner environment, but ethanol has caused numerous problems for boaters. Ethanol loosens deposits in boat fuel tanks and can dissolve resin in these tanks. This causes engines to stop working. What happens next? The fuel has to be disposed of or cleaned. Think of the environmental impact that either of these procedures has when hundreds of gallons of fuel are affected. As a boater, I clearly have strong feelings about ethanol. However, boating aside, I do wonder if the energy used in creating ethanol and transporting it to gas stations outweighs any environmental benefit that may be had from its use.

  • Thanks for your comment Sean. It’s an interesting take I didn’t consider. I’ve found myself in canoes more than gas powered boats in my life, so I never knew about that.

    I guess the same can be said for many household items that are gas powered: lawn mowers, leaf blowers, weed wackers, tractors, etc.

    You should check out Who Killed the Electric Car for an eye-opening experience. It’s a great movie.

  • Thanks for your comment Sean. It’s an interesting take I didn’t consider. I’ve found myself in canoes more than gas powered boats in my life, so I never knew about that.

    I guess the same can be said for many household items that are gas powered: lawn mowers, leaf blowers, weed wackers, tractors, etc.

    You should check out Who Killed the Electric Car for an eye-opening experience. It’s a great movie.